The European Union must provide a clear regulatory framework for blockchain

Two years on since the implementation of the GDPR, the EU’s data protection law, some significant fines have been handed out to the likes of Google, British Airways, and Marriott. Despite this, the regulation has only begun to scratch the surface of its broader goals of improving data protections for all. Last year was theContinue reading “The European Union must provide a clear regulatory framework for blockchain”

As internet controls in China tighten, privacy and data protection rights slowly make headway

Due to state surveillance and censorship, privacy and data protection rights in China are often assumed to be inexistent. But for private companies, privacy and data protection laws appear to be developing in the direction of European standards. It has taken correcting the worst of abuses to get where they are now, though. Privacy andContinue reading “As internet controls in China tighten, privacy and data protection rights slowly make headway”

COVID-19, data protection, and the consolidation of the Indian surveillance state

India’s contact tracing app, Aarogya Setu (meaning “bridge to health” in Sanskrit), was released on April 2. The app is similar in many ways to other contact tracing apps, but it looked mainly to the model of China: you input data about yourself including your name, age, and travel history; the app enables Bluetooth andContinue reading “COVID-19, data protection, and the consolidation of the Indian surveillance state”

Is Tencent the next Nokia? A look behind Tencent’s ruthless censorship of competition and criticism

Tencent cares a lot about its public image – to the extent that it blocks articles criticising its business. Are its censored critics onto something? We take a look at the company’s life-or-death business model. In May, an article published on WeChat criticising Tencent spread on Chinese social media and was soon blocked on allContinue reading “Is Tencent the next Nokia? A look behind Tencent’s ruthless censorship of competition and criticism”